November 22, 2017

Category: Mental/Behavioral Health

Click here for our May 2016 newsletter, which introduces our Center, and the four core Center partners. Check our our latest resources, upcoming newsletter issues and other resources for Mental Health Awareness Month and Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month. Mental Health Resources Many mental/behavioral health issues first emerge during the adolescent and young adult years: Among…

Led by our partners at Child Trends, NAHIC developed two reports examining how youth are faring in the transition to adulthood, with respect to having problems related to heavy alcohol use, illicit drug use, criminal behavior, and financial hardship.

This article, authored by NAHIC’s Sally Adams, David Knopf, and Jane Park, appears in Emerging Adulthood. According to the study, Young adults ages 18-25 had higher rates of mental health (MH) and substance use (SU) disorders, but lower treatment rates, compared to adults ages 26-34. Among young adults, fewer than 50% received treatment for MH…

The researchers found that young, heterosexual adults who reported depressive or suicidal symptoms during adolescence are significantly more likely to report:

This 2012 study by researchers in the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine examined the current rates of medical home attainment for adolescents.

This 2012 brief analyzes panel data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health for 9,996 adolescents to assess whether the receipt of supportive (psychological or emotional) counseling and access to health insurance is related to the persistence of adolescent depression and/or suicidality into young adulthood.

This brief by Child Trends (created through a partnership with NAHIC) identifies 46 out-of-school time programs that have shown positive impacts on adolescent or young adult outcomes. Outcome categories include behavior problems, substance use, reproductive health, social-emotional health, life skills, education, and physical health.

This 2012 paper presents lessons learned from 37 random-assignment social intervention programs for adolescents that are designed to prevent or treat internalizing problems.

This 2009 paper assesses primary care providers’ rates of screening for emotional distress among adolescent patients and argues that primary care clinicians/systems need to better utilize the primary care visit to screen adolescents for emotional health.

This 2008 article uses AddHealth data to compare rates of mental health counseling use between adolescents and young adults.