July 22, 2017

Realizing the Dream for Californians Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA): A Two-Part Series on the DACA-Eligible Population in California

Millions of Californians are expected to gain health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Between three and four million, however, are likely to remain uninsured, including about one million undocumented immigrants who are not eligible for the ACA’s federal coverage options. Included in this group are teens and young adults who are eligible for or have been granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The DACA program provides temporary work authorization and relief from deportation for certain undocumented youth immigrants. The state’s policymakers are considering options to expand health coverage to all Californians, including “DACA eligibles.” This report series, authored by NAHIC’s Claire Brindis along with associates at the UCSF Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education, and UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, highlights health issues of this population, and provides potential solutions to improve health access and outcomes.

Realizing the Dream for Californians Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA): Demographics and Health Coverage

This report describes health care coverage of DACA-eligible Californians and presents potential policy solutions to expand their coverage options.

Realizing the Dream for Californians Eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA): Health Needs and Access to Care
This report describes the common sources of care, barriers to care, and health needs for DACA-eligible Californians, and presents potential solutions for health care providers, community-based organizations, and private and public funders to improve health and access to care.

 

Please find below two pieces on the DACA population published in the Journal of Adolescent Health:

“There Is No Help Out There and If There Is, It’s Really Hard to Find”: A Qualitative Study of the Health Concerns and Health Care Access of Latino “DREAMers”

As the first study to describe DACA-eligible young adults’ health needs, these data demonstrate their profound mental health challenges and numerous barriers to health care access. Many barriers were attributed to their undocumented status and persisted even when they gained temporary legal status. This work provides a foundation for evidence-based policy changes to address the health needs of this and other undocumented populations.

 How Can We Build A Better Safety Net? Aligning Immigration and Health Care Policies for Childhood Arrivals

This editorial piece, by Nancy Gonzales, PhD, at Arizona State University, accompanies the aforementioned article in the Journal of Adolescent Health.