Research :: The 6 biggest health mistakes women make in their 20’s

NAHIC’s Director, Dr. Charles E. Irwin, spoke with Today.com about “The 6 biggest health mistakes women make in their 20s,” including a lack of attention to bone health and not obtaining care through a primary care provider.

Read the July 2015 article HERE.

TOPIC(S)

AYAH Resource Center, Clinical Preventive Services, Sexual and Reproductive Health, Young Adults

DATE POSTED

October 9, 2015

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