Research :: Adolescent and Young Adult Health in the United States in the Past Decade: Little Improvement and Young Adults Remain Worse Off Than Adolescents

This review paper, entitled Adolescent and Young Adult Health in the United States in the Past Decade: Little Improvement and Young Adults Remain Worse Off  Than Adolescents, was published by researchers at the National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center (NAHIC). The paper has two aims: (1) to examine trends in key indicators in outcomes, behaviors, and health care over the past decade for U.S. adolescents and young adults; and (2) to compare U.S. adolescents and young adults on these indicators. It also assesses sociodemographic differences in trends and current indicators. Guided by its aims, previous reviews, and national priorities, the present review identified 21 sources of nationally representative data to examine trends in 53 areas and comparisons of adolescents and young adults in 42 areas. The authors found that most health and health care indicators have changed little over the past decade. A review of current indicators demonstrates that young adulthood continues to entail greater risk and worse outcomes than adolescence. Young adults fared worse on about two-thirds of the indicators examined. Differences among sociodemographic subgroups persisted for both trends and current indicators.

Produced by the National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center.

Trends in Adolescent and Young Adult Health

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TOPIC(S)

Access & Utilization, Data and Monitoring, Journal Articles, Mortality, Risky Behavior, Socio-demographic disparities, Trends, Young Adults

DATE POSTED

June 13, 2014

PDF DOWNLOAD(S)

National Data Sources for Monitoring Adolescent and Young Adult Health
AYA Table of Health Outcomes (Master Data File)

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