Research :: Young Adult Preventive Health Guidelines: There But Can’t Be Found

This study by researchers in the Division of Adolescent Medicine sought to 1) identify existing adolescent and adult clinical preventive services guidelines relevant to the young adult age group; 2) review, compare, and synthesize these guidelines, with emphasis on the extent to which professional guidelines are consistent with evidence-based guidelines developed by the USPSTF; and 3) recommend next steps in the establishment and integration of preventive guidelines for young adults.

Existing professional and government guidelines were searched to identify guidelines that intersect with the age range of 18 to 26 years. When the ages of 18 to 26 years are “carved” out of established professional guidelines across specialty groups, there are a broad number of recommendations, many supported by sufficient evidence to receive a USPSTF grade of A or B, that can inform the care of young adults.

The study recommends the establishment of “Young Adult Preventive Care Guidelines” that reflect the current evidence-based recommendations that overlap with the young adult age group; suggest clinician and health care system supports to facilitate the delivery of preventive services to young adults, and emphasize prioritizing research in prevention areas where sufficient evidence does not exist.

Young Adult Preventive Health Care Guidelines: There but Can’t Be Found; Elizabeth M. Ozer, PhD; John T. Urquhart, BA; Claire D. Brindis, DrPH; M. Jane Park, MPH; Charles E. Irwin Jr, MD; Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(3):240-247

TOPIC(S)

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DATE POSTED

March 5, 2012

AUTHOR(S)

Elizabeth M. Ozer, PhD; John T. Urquhart, BA; Claire D. Brindis, DrPH, MPH; M. Jane Park, MPH; and Charles E. Irwin, Jr., MD

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