November 19, 2017

Archives: Resources

This 2014 article, written by researchers from the University of California San Francisco Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, investigates the health needs and challenges of DACA-eligible young adults, a population that has rarely been studied. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program served qualified undocumented young immigrants who may be eligible for…

This original research article, Improvement in Preventive Care of Young Adults After the Affordable Care Act: The Affordable Care Act Is Helping, by researchers in the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine investigated how the implementation of the 2010 Affordable Care Act affected young adults’ rates of insurance and receipt of preventive services. Using data…

This brief, released in November 2014, in partnership with Child Trends, provides an accessible summary of research  on adolescents’ families and family factors related to adolescent health and well-being. Topics addressed include family meals, family demographics and parents’ health-related  behaviors in areas such as exercise and smoking. This brief updates Child Trends 2006 brief on adolescents’  family environment The 2014 brief…

Consistent with prior research, a 2014 Research Brief from our partners at Child Trends presented mixed findings on the relationship between state policy and adolescent alcohol use. Higher beer taxes and laws requiring that beer kegs be registered are associated with decreases in adolescent drinking, laws that impose a driver’s license penalty for consumption are…

The past decade has witnessed a tremendous expansion of research and resources on “what works” to improve adolescent health. Despite the greater selection of effective programs and practical tools, this valuable implementation information is difficult to locate in one place. This resource has two aims: To serve as a guide to communities and practitioners for locating effective adolescent health interventions; To identify selected “implementing tools” designed to help communities implement evidence-based programs.

These information briefs give an overview of the causes of each issue, followed by information on evidence-based programs addressing the issues. They also provide other resources on the topics.

NAHIC was represented by senior faculty Drs. Claire Brindis and Charles E. Irwin Jr. at the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council conference held in Washington, D.C. in May 2013. The focus of the workshop was “Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Young Adults.”

This 2014 original article by researchers in the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine examines young adults’ health care utilization and expenditures prior to the Affordable Care Act. Using data from the 2009 Medical Expenditures Survey, Lau et al found that young adults had significantly lower rates of overall healthcare utilization that other age…